I’ve been duped! “NYX” matte lipstick, or that’s what I thought…

I wanted to add a matte lipstick to my stash, so one day I saw this NYX matte lipstick in a shop window, I went in to nab it… no luck with the purchase, though, because a while after I’d opened it I began to suspect it was a fake.

“NYX” matte lipstick, or how to throw 7€ in the trash

Question before proceeding: notice something not-quite-right about this product?

matte lipstick

More clues…

Solution to the question posed about the 1st image:

Fake NYX liquid lipstick

Voulez-vous épeler avec moi, ce soir? Crème à lèvres, ignorant counterfeiters de merde, crème à lèvres… Off the top of my head, I don’t think the letter “m” has an accent mark in any language, but what I’m certain of is that it doesn’t in French, something that the official brand knows quite well… also, the French word is “mate“, not “matte”.

For comparison, here’s the original item, bought from an authorized seller:

My Cosmetic Art NYX labiales

NYX Soft Matte Lip Cream – photo by Elena, author of the blog My Cosmetic Art.

Although I’m kind of a grammar and accent mark nazi, I didn’t notice the discrepancies until I began to edit this product’s photos for a post; the enlarged pics confirmed my growing suspicion that I’d been duped with a très fake NYX lipstick. Well, that and that “crucky free”… my eyes are still burning, ugh.

In view of this, I hit the internet to dig for more info, and lo, I found this post by an Ebay user: Guide to identify fake NYX Soft Matte Lip Creams, with images of various fakes vs the official product, as well as a list of Ebay sellers caught in fraganti selling these items. The post is from a couple of years ago, so I guess counterfeiters got wind of it, and decided to make some needed alterations to make it look more a bit more like the real thing… they should have enlisted the help of someone with a passing grasp of languages and spelling, though.

Don’t let it happen to you!

I admit fooling me with such a thing is quite easy, because I just can’t see the point in counterfeiting a product that can be bought authentic for a small price, at least over here (I know that it does happen often in other parts of the world where these products are in a higher price-tier/less affordable for many).

I mean, I sort of “get” counterfeiting high-end pricey items: there’s no shortage of buyers of the sort I call “because I’m worth it! But damn if I’m gonna pay for it” who create a demand for that sort of thing… but this is a product that in it’s original form doesn’t cost more than 6-7€, which was what I paid (6.50€ to be precise); do not think I bought this because I thought: “whoa, what a steal, I’m sooo smart for buying things this cheap!

Via GIPHY While I’m at it, I have to say it: I just can’t with “hauls” and so-called steals from the online equivalent of car boot sellers… if that makes me a snob, fine…

By now you’ll probably wonder: did you go to the shop to complain? Did you contact NYX about it?

Yes to both. First I wrote to NYX Spain and sent photos of the product, asking them if they could confirm if, as I thought, it was a fake.

That was some weeks ago, and after a first reply in which the answer was to direct me to another department of the firm, I haven’t got a reply from the firm, and it doesn’t seem as though I will… oh well, even if they had nothing to do with my purchase, you’d think they’d bother to reply to a possible customer’s question, particularly one about an issue as potentially serious for a brand’s image as counterfeiting…

I also think it worth mentioning, in case anyone’s wondering, that I did not buy this from Ebay, AliExpress, dodgy discount shop round the corner, or anything of the sort; I bought it in a small shop in my town that specializes in beauty and haircare products from various well-known brands.

Personally, for the most part I avoid Ebay and all suspiciously low-priced overseas outlets/marketplaces… whenever possible I try to buy from small (i.e. not chain) shops and exhaust the possibilities of local businesses before heading online… but stunts like these make me reconsider this approach, since it’s not the first time I have a thing like this happen. But anyway, I went to the shop, and after talking to the owner, I think there was no bad faith in her part, and she purchased the product in the understanding that it was the real thing. So far so good.

Having said that, what put me on guard was the fact that she frankly admitted that the item did not come from the official dealer, because despite all her best efforts, it had not been possible to get to the distributor (and seeing that NYX Spain couldn’t be bothered with replying to my question either, I believe her), so she ended up purchasing them from a “girl who brings them”, who supposedly “buys overstock from past seasons” to resell.

So much for not going online… if I’d known this before purchasing, I wouldn’t have touched this thing with a laser pointer. If I wanted stuff from “a girl who brings these”, I’d just go the Ebay/Amazon sellers route… well, no, because I don’t want anything grey-market, so I’d just go to NYX’s site… and in view of their non-responsiveness when contacted, I don’t think I’ll do that either.

Fake "NYX" liquid lipstick

The snitch lippie: “So you think your lips are smooth and well-nourished? LOL, no… allow me to dispel that notion…”

Anyhow, while I was there the shop owner contacted the supplier, and her response was “we buy them from the same place everyone buys” (and where is it that everyone buys from, hm? Mysteries that cannot be unveiled to ingrate riffraff that questions Entrepreneuses… ) and that if she found a problem with the product, all she had to do was “say it, so I don’t bring them again“.

I thought the supplier was pretty rude and snotty, to be honest, as did the shop owner, something that made me even more suspicious. She remained on the defensive, saying things like “if it was a fake, it would smell bad” (it did smell pretty funky when I first opened it… now it smells like vanilla, same as the real thing, from what I’ve heard… the counterfeiters were pretty stupid with the packaging, but the product itself passes muster in this respect), and that “it would look bad on” (it looks awful on, but at least I know this happens often with many matte liquid lipsticks, so I won’t hold this against it)

 

liquid lipstick INCI

If you snoop NYX’s website, you’ll see that the ingredients list is somewhat different (though it’s true that the brand itself says that the INCI list may vary on the packaging). In theory, this is formulated with: Isohexadecane, Pentaerythrityl Tetraisostearate, Disteardimonium Hectorite, Dimethicone, Beeswax/Cera Alba/Cire d’Abeille, Glyceryl Behenate/Eicosadioate, Talc, Cyclopentasiloxane, Propylene Carbonate, Silica, Methyl Methacrylate Crosspolymer, Aluminum Starch Octenylsuccinate, Dimethicone Crosspolymer, Rosin/Colophonium/Colophane, Barium Sulfate (CI 77120), Phenoxyethanol, Flavor/Aroma, Benzyl Alcohol, Benzyl Benzoate, Benzyl Salicylate, Hexyl Cinnamal, Hydroxycitronellal. MAY CONTAIN / PEUT CONTENIR (+/-): Mica, Titanium Dioxide (CI 77891), Iron Oxides (CI 77491, CI 77492, CI 77499), Manganese Violet (CI 77742), Yellow 6 Lake (CI 15985), Yellow 5 Lake (CI 19140), Red 6 (CI 15850), Red 7 (CI 15850), Red 28 Lake (CI 45410).

And I say “in theory”, because if I question that this is from the brand it purports to be, I don’t trust this to have antifreeze in it, or worse… I can say that I tried it a couple of times, before I realized I’d bought a fake, but aside from looking like 💩 mummified in salt, at least it didn’t make my lips react.

Anyway, after all this…

… at least, besides material for a post, I got a good lesson: Do Not Buy Anything Ever if there’s no guarantee that it’s from an authorized seller. Leaving this here along with the photos, so others can make sure not to buy anything of this sort.

 

Guardar

Guardar

Guardar

Guardar

Guardar

Guardar

Guardar

4 comments

Thank you for commenting!